Seismic lab

Application of seismic reflection data to the analysis of carbonate depositional systems

The Department of Earth Science and Engineering at Imperial College has extensive experience in the seismic reflection interpretation of carbonate depositional systems from a range of sedimentary basins (e.g. offshore northern Norway; offshore Borneo; offshore NW Australia). We use a combination of 2D and 3D seismic reflection datasets, and a key element of our research is the application of basic seismic-stratigraphic principles and detailed, ‘line-by-line’ seismic mapping to generate accurate maps of the subsurface. These maps are critical in determining the large-scale morphology and distribution of carbonate depositional systems, and these maps are then typically used to generate seismic attribute maps, which themselves may reveal much about the internal architecture and stratigraphic variability of the depositional system of interest. Seismic interpretation is conducted using a combination of industry-standard software packages that includes Petrel, Kingdom Suite, Seisworks and Powerview. Interpretation is conducted on high-specification workstations and data are securely stored on a university-hosted data server.

If you have any questions regarding seismic-based projects related to carbonate depositional systems, please do not hesitate to contact me via c.jackson@imperial.ac.uk or on the phone +44(0)2075947450. Alternatively, click here to be taken to my carbonate research group website.

Image above: time-structure map and intersecting seismic section illustrating mounded carbonate build-ups (mid-Carboniferous to Lower Permian) on the Loppa High, Barents Sea, offshore northern Norway. Although the lithology of the core of the build-ups is unknown, the build-ups appear to enclose shallow lagoons.

Image above: dip map generated from a time-structure map (see Image 1) illustrating mounded carbonate build-ups (mid-Carboniferous to Lower Permian) on the Loppa High, Barents Sea, offshore northern Norway. Note the distinct polygonal map-view pattern to the build-ups, which is interpreted to be related to growth of the build-ups on an underlying polygonal fault network.